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Phone: 845-758-7490
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Events 2017

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Past Events

            

2014

Wednesday, October 29, 2014
Places and Spaces for STEM Identity Development in Youth and Science Educators
Ongoing Qualitative Research in Informal Science Learning
Olin, Room 102  6:00 pm
Presented by Jennifer D. Adams
"This informal science education field is growing as we learn more about how people learn science outside of the formal school setting. During this presentation I will highlight qualitative research in informal science learning for youth and teachers. In particular, I will discuss how I use a sociocultural lens around place and identity to elucidate how people learn science in these settings and the people they become in relation to their science learning. I will discuss the connections between places of science learning and enactment and developing positive STEM identities in general and in underrepresented students (African American, Latin@ and first generation students and girls/women) in particular. I will conclude my presentation with a general discussion about the informal science education field."

Jennifer D. Adams is an associate professor of science education at Brooklyn College and The Graduate Center, CUNY. Her research focuses on STEM teaching and learning in urban informal science contexts including museums, National Parks and everyday learning.  She has worked as an educator and researcher in NYC public schools and the American Museum of Natural History. She was awarded the prestigious National Science Foundation Early CAREER award to study informal learning contexts and formal/informal collaborations for STEM teacher education. Her research portfolio also includes youth learning and identity in informal science contexts, with a focus on underrepresented youth and place/identity in transnational communities and environmental education.  She uses a combined sociocultural and geographical lens to study the relationships between people, places and learning. 


Sponsored by: Citizen Science Program
Julie Cerulli  jcerulli@bard.edu
Saturday, September 20, 2014
Maker Faire!
The Science, Mathematics & Computing Division will be sending a bus down to the New York Hall of Science in Queens, NY on Saturday, September 20. Space on the bus is LIMITED. The bus will depart RKC promptly at 9 a.m. and return to campus at approximately 7 p.m.

Tickets to get into the Faire and a spot in the van are $30.00.  

CASH ONLY, EXACT CHANGE ONLY.
Reservations will be accepted until Friday, September 12

TO RESERVE YOUR TICKET AND A SPOT IN THE VAN, 
PLEASE SEE MEGAN KARCHER, RKC 219. Office hours are Monday-Friday, 8:00-4:00 p.m.


Sponsored by: Center for Civic Engagement; Chemistry Program; Citizen Science Program; Computer Science Program; Division of Science, Mathematics, and Computing; Physics Program
Keith O'Hara  845-752-2359  kohara@bard.edu
  Tuesday, September 16, 2014
Citizen Science Teaching Fellow Information Session
Led by Teaching Fellows from 2014
RKC 111  6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Are you a sophomore or junior interested in applying to be a 2015 Citizen Science Teaching Fellow?If so, please plan to attend one of our information sessions to find out more.   Members of our 2014 CSTF team will be on hand to answer all your questions.Our information session will be on Tuesday, September 16 from 6-7p.m. in RKC 111. If you are interested in applying, please check out the posting on www.collegecentral.com/Bard and come to this info session. 

Sponsored by: Citizen Science Program
Julie Cerulli  845-758-7490  jcerulli@bard.edu
  Wednesday, September 10, 2014
Citizen Science Teaching Fellow Information Session
Led by Teaching Fellows from 2014
RKC 111  6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Are you a sophomore or junior interested in applying to be a 2015 Citizen Science Teaching Fellow?If so, please plan to attend one of our information sessions to find out more.   Members of our 2014 CSTF team will be on hand to answer all your questions.Our information session will be on Wednesday, September 10 from 6-7p.m. in RKC 111. Can’t make it then? We’ll have another opportunity on Tuesday, September 16 also in RKC 111, 6-7p.m.If you are interested in applying, please check out the posting on www.collegecentral.com/Bard and come to one of our info sessions. 

Sponsored by: Citizen Science Program
Julie Cerulli  845-758-7490  jcerulli@bard.edu
  Thursday, September 4, 2014
Citizen Science Teaching Fellow Information Session
Led by Teaching Fellows from January 2014
RKC 111  6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Are you a sophomore or junior interested in applying to be a 2015 Citizen Science Teaching Fellow? If so, please plan to attend one of our information sessions to find out more. Members of our 2014 CSTF team will be on hand to answer all your questions.Our first information session will be on Thursday, September 4 from 6-7p.m. in RKC 111. 

Can't make it then?  We'll have two more on Wednesday, September 10 and Tuesday, September 16 also in RKC 111, 6-7p.m.If you are interested in applying, please check out the posting on www.collegecentral.com/Bard and come to one of our info sessions.

Sponsored by: Citizen Science Program
Julie Cerulli  845-758-7490  jcerulli@bard.edu
Wednesday, January 15, 2014
City Farms for City Dwellers
Presented by Dickson Despommier
Fisher Center, Sosnoff Theater  6:30 pm
Urban agriculture is on the increase throughout the world. Urban farms are of several kinds: soil-based outdoor, soil-based indoor, single and multiple floor (vertical farms) indoor hydroponic and aeroponic farms. Aquaculture is also becoming popular. There are many vertical farms up and running in Japan, Korea, Singapore, Sweden, USA, and Canada. Most of them grow leafy greens for sale to restaurants and high end supermarkets, such as Whole Foods. Eventually, the concept of vertical farming will aid in bringing relief to disadvantaged populations (refugees, victims of wars and natural disasters). One consequence of farming in cities is that farmland can then be abandoned and allowed to return to its original ecological setting. This might help slow down climate change.

Dr. Despommier is an Emeritus Professor with appointments in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health Department of Microbiology, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Columbia University.

Sponsored by: Citizen Science Program
Julie Cerulli  845-758-7490  jcerulli@bard.edu
Monday, January 13, 2014
Killing Persistent Mycobacterium tuberculosis:  Insights from Captain James and Harry Houdini
Presented by William Jacobs
Fisher Center, Sosnoff Theater  6:30 pm
Infectious diseases have plagued mankind throughout history and have posed serious public health problems.  Yet, vaccines have eradicated small pox and antibiotics have drastically decreased the mortality rate of many infectious agents.  These remarkable successes in the control of infections came from knowing the causative agents of the diseases followed by serendipitous discoveries of attenuated viruses and antibiotics. Knowledge of the mechanisms of immunity and mechanisms of action of drugs has led to new vaccines and new antimicrobial agents.  The key to the acquisition of the knowledge of these mechanisms has been identifying the elemental causes (i.e. genes and their products) that mediate immunity and drug resistance.  The identification of these genes is made possible by being able to transfer the genes or mutated forms of the genes into causative agents or surrogate hosts.  Such an approach was limited in Mycobacterium tuberculosis by the difficulty of transferring genes or alleles into M. tuberculosis or a suitable surrogate mycobacterial host.  The construction of shuttle phasmids, chimeric molecules that replicate in Escherichia coli as plasmids and in mycobacteria as mycobacteriophages, was instrumental in developing gene transfer systems for M. tuberculosis.  This presentation will discuss M. tuberculosis genetic systems and their impact on tuberculosis (TB) research. Dr. Jacobs is an investigator with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine.  

Sponsored by: Citizen Science Program
Julie Cerulli  845-758-7490  jcerulli@bard.edu
Wednesday, January 8, 2014
Drinking from the Firehose: Infectious Diseases in the Age of Big Data
Presented by Annie Hoen
Fisher Center, Sosnoff Theater  6:30 pm
Large, complex and dynamic datasets that reflect real world phenomena--so-called "big data"--are transforming science, government, business and the arts. In a rapidly changing world, big data has the potential to inform solutions to complex problems, but there are many challenges to overcome. Here I will discuss possible applications of big data to the complex and critical problem of infectious disease prevention and control. I will make an argument for the importance of information in understanding and controlling infectious threats to health and review conventional approaches to public health surveillance, preparedness and response for infectious diseases. Next I will discuss recent advances and new ideas for harnessing the power of big data for infectious disease control including applications to real-time surveillance, mapping, and outbreak investigation and the use of data mining, crowd sourcing, remote sensing and genomics. Examples will include specific disease systems such as influenza, dengue, and malaria. Finally, I will talk about challenges such as issues of spatial and temporal scale, computational hurdles and reliability, and comment on the outlook for big data science in infectious disease epidemiology.

Dr. Hoen is an instructor at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth Department of Community and Family Medicine. She was also an instructor in the Citizen Science program in 2011 and 2012.

Sponsored by: Citizen Science Program
Julie Cerulli  845-758-7490  jcerulli@bard.edu
Tuesday, January 7, 2014
Innovation Spread: Lessons from HIV
Presented by Kristina Talbert-Slagle
Fisher Center, Sosnoff Theater  6:30 pm
HIV, which has 9 genes and makes 15 proteins, infects human cells that have 20,000 genes and make thousands of proteins. Despite having a miniscule set of biological tools and a structure that is far simpler than the cells it infects, HIV can successfully integrate into cellular DNA and spread, first among cells inside the body and then to other human bodies.  In this presentation, Dr. Talbert-Slagle will describe her work using HIV as a biological model for the spread of global health innovations in complex systems, including a discussion of parallels between a cell and a complex human system and between HIV and a successful health innovation.  This framework has been applied to understand the spread of global health innovations in low- and middle-income countries and also to the spread of an intervention to reduce door-to-balloon time among patients with ST segment elevation myocardial infarction in the United States. Dr. Talbert-Slagle is an Associate Research Scientist and Lecturer at the Global Health Leadership Institute in the School of Epidemiology and Public Health.    

Sponsored by: Citizen Science Program
Julie Cerulli  845-758-7490  jcerulli@bard.edu